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INSPIRE TEAM-WIDE ENGAGEMENT THROUGH CLEAR EXPECTATIONS

Inspire Team-Wide Engagement Through Clear Expectations

How to Win Your Employees’ Hearts by Raising Their Standards

You can’t hold someone accountable for something they’re unaware of. It’s surprising how often leaders actually do this. Before you think you’re excluded, stay with me.

When my wife and I bought our first home, we went to Home Depot to buy some plants for our new backyard. While I was perusing, I felt a sharp pain in the back of my leg. I turned around and saw my assailant: a child no more than three years old. He had pushed a shopping cart right into me. His father came running over, mortified, and apologizing. It left a mark and caused my leg to bleed and I couldn’t get mad. This kid had likely never learned that slamming shopping carts into other people isn’t ok. He wasn’t being disobedient or reckless. He was trying a new experience, and unfortunately for me, it wasn’t his best moment. But I couldn’t feel anger – he had no idea what he was doing.

Your employees aren’t much different. They’re always on the lookout for cues on what they should be doing. Without voicing your expectations, you shouldn’t consider them established. Consequentially, you can’t be mad or surprised when they go unmet by your staff. If you haven’t thoroughly trained someone, how can you hold them accountable?

What you Permit, You Promote

This is why personal accountability is paramount for effective leadership. You have to level-up your own game before you can ask your staff to make any changes. Your efforts will go nowhere if you’re caught holding your employees to a higher standard than yourself. For example, getting to work on time. If you’re often late, you’re setting the expectation that tardiness is tolerable. Exhibiting poor behavior is promoting poor behavior. As the leader, you may feel like you should be able to roll in whenever. But you never know what your employees have ingrained in them about punctuality. If you don’t tell them to prioritize promptness, you cannot fault them for making their own time.

I’ve lead thousands of people in my career, and unmet expectations is always a theme. Common complaints I hear from leaders about their staff include but are not limited to:

  • Using inappropriate language
  • Missed deadlines
  • Lack of engagement during meetings
  • Tending to personal matters while working
  • Unprofessional appearances

These are all issues stemming from poor communication from the leader. But why state the obvious when it comes to abhorrent behavior? Consider the study guide provided for the Canadian citizenship test. It notes that violations such as spousal abuse and gender-based violence is unacceptable. Canada doesn’t take for granted that people will identify these as punishable acts. And what does Canada lose by stating it? Half an inch of space on a PDF? What you have to gain from effective communication will also outweigh what you have to lose.

Leadership to Mentoring

How a leader handles an unmet expectation speaks to the control they hold. A great leader coaches where a struggling leader will punish. A “gotcha” manager is an unsustainable manager. That is begging for a team without loyalty or dedication. If you’re only catching people when they’re doing something wrong, you’re not getting the most or best out of your employees. Help them well before it reaches that point by giving them the instructions they crave.

As a leader, it’s up to you to set expectations among your team. From each recruits’ first day to an existing employee’s tenth year in. It’s never too late to turn your wayward staff into a dream team. In a study by from Florida State University, shows that curated work-goals (self-assigned or provided) can increase employee productivity even without monetary incentives.  Reaching for a target allows them to be more productive. They’ll also come to view you as a driving force for their improvement. In other words, you’ll win their hearts and raise their standards all in one go. That’s how you go from becoming a Leader to becoming their Mentor.

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 

To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon

See on Linkedin:  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/inspire-team-wide-engagement-through-clear-hernani-alves/

How to Be a Better Manager with the 3 Ps of Accountability

Lead by example to help reshape the future of your employees

By Hernani Alves:  As seen in Construction Magazine

Predict the Future

Abraham Lincoln said the best way to predict your future is to create it. One of the United States’ greatest presidents acknowledged that everyone is in control of their own destiny. Lincoln faced one of the biggest challenges of any president: slavery. With such a harshly divided nation, he could have easily become defeated by the challenges he faced. Instead, he did what all phenomenal leaders do—he led by example. Because of his leadership, the inhumanity of slavery was contained. He created a new reality, a new destiny. Today’s business leaders must also lead by example with the three Ps of accountability.

1. Personal Accountability

It’s easy to get caught up in deadlines and forget that work is a personal experience. Many people spend more time at work than anywhere else. When you spend this much time somewhere, the environment is bound to rub off on you. The sheer amount of time involved is why company leaders influence is so impactful.

Your employees are watching you, and they are mimicking what you do. As such, it’s important to hold yourself accountable before you can expect to hold others accountable. Make yourself better first so that you can lead by example. This is difficult, as it requires self-awareness, which doesn’t come naturally to most of us, but is essential.

Leaders must also understand themselves before they can successfully lead others. If you take the victim stance, your employees will too, and then they’ll be harder to lead. Have a hero mentality in front of your employees and be open to their feedback about how you can improve as a leader. Ask them, “What would you like me to do more and less of as a leader?” Then, listen and take action.

2. Positive Accountability

Positivity isn’t about being a cheerleader about every situation. Employees can see through a false demeanor or sugar coating a bad situation. Positivity is an overall attitude and approach to managing. It’s about catching employees doing things right.

See the best in a situation and inspire your workers to do the same. This relates back to your personal touch in personal accountability. If you’re not portraying positivity, your employees can’t mimic it.

Watch the language you use, as well. Even something as simple as an email explaining an update to the company’s insurance plan is an opportunity for spreading positivity. For example, if your company’s plan has recently added a free yearly dental cleaning for its employees, don’t just make “Changes to your dental insurance plan” as your email subject line. This vague statement could send employees into a panic about what may now not be covered that once was. And this will be especially worrisome for someone facing a painful procedure like a root canal.

Instead, make the subject line positive instead. Replace the word “change” with “improve.” For example, “Improvements to your dental insurance plan.” It seems minute and perhaps trivial, but building up small messages of positivity such as these set a tone for your workforce.  The word change tends to make people think negative at first when it truly means improvements.

3. Performance Accountability

This is more in line with most people’s understanding of accountability—hauling someone up for their actions, discipline or performance reviews. You can’t skip this part, but you can’t reach it without the first having both personal and positive accountability.

Once you build personal relationships and set a tone of positivity, your employees respect you and may want to hear your feedback about their performance. Wanting to please authority figures you admire and trust is human nature.

The real job of a boss is coaching. It’s not about being a pushover—you must be firm about unforgivable grievances. But you must also look for opportunities to build employees up and make them greater than yourself.

Once you put these practices in place, you’ll build a team of engaged, positive-minded employees who come to work looking for ways to make their employer happy. The bottom line of needing to work for income will always be there, but added to it will be purpose and true enjoyment of their work and colleagues.

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon

Link:  https://www.constructionbusinessowner.com/management/be-better-manager-3-ps-accountability

Making a Resolution and Sticking to IT (No Really?)


Three tricks for achieving your New Year’s resolution with
balanced accountability


By Hernani Alves:  As seen in Professional Car Wash Magazine

Setting a goal for the New Year may feel like manifesting the new you. Who is not trying to get promoted, eat healthier, spend more quality time with family and travel more? What makes us think that a magical switch goes off on Jan. 1st that will allow us to change? The expectation is far-fetched, and yet over 40% of Americans partake. 

Don’t get me wrong — there is no shame in trying to change for the better, but we are failing to make it work. It can be demoralizing. It is no wonder that New Year’s resolutions have an 80% failure rate. It is time to change this and make it an 80% success rate.

Balanced accountability

New Year’s resolutions have become ambitions without a plan. “Save money,” “get in shape” and “travel” were all top resolutions set by Americans in 2018. But what do those aspirations look like? The statements in themselves do not offer a starting place. 

To achieve something, you need to have a path towards that goal. Like a map to your destination, you must be able to see where you are going — street names, landmarks and mile markers. In goal setting, your map is “balanced accountability.”

Balanced accountability is accountability that is fair and balanced. It uses clear expectations and firm rules weighed with praise and rewards. It guides you to where you want to go and keeps you motivated to continue. It is practiced by using what I call the 3Ps.

The 3Ps

I am proud to say that for the last three years, every member of my family has kept their New Year’s resolutions. We have done so with the 3Ps of accountability.

 Personal accountability

To keep a resolution, it is crucial to hold yourself accountable. I struggled with this for years, but now I know exactly what this means and how to do it. Share your aspirations with friends and family. Ask for help, and be open about your successes and struggles. Give yourself the personal accountability that you need. 

Positive accountability

How do you eat an elephant? One small bite at a time, and positivity is essential to staying driven. You need to celebrate the small accomplishments along the way to reaching your goal. Tell others when you have a win, and bring them in on your journey. Reward yourself.

Performance accountability

This is the traditional practice of “holding yourself accountable.” But it uses coaching, not penalizing. This is your starting point for mapping out the path to your objective. 

Mapping out a resolution

In December 2018, my family wanted me to give blood as a way to help our community during the holidays. My blood type (O-) is always in demand, so my family insisted that I take action and help others. As much as I wanted to help out, I was apprehensive. I have never been good at giving blood — meaning I pass out. Even so, I agreed to try.

The blood drive was packed. It was great, and there were so many people there ready and willing to give. When the facilitators of the drive noticed my blood type, they pulled out the VIP treatment. I was moved to the front of the line, and they only took about three minutes to prepare for my blood draw. On the first attempt, they missed the vein, and I started to get woozy — right on cue. They had to stop the process and send me home as a “pre-fainter.” At that moment, I resolved that in 2019, I was going to do something I had never done before: donate blood at least five times. 

The sentiment was great but a little unclear. What did I want? To give blood once that year, no matter what? To teach myself how to give blood without passing out? To give blood every other month? I was not going to reach my goal without knowing what it was. How could I? Even if I found myself on a path, what was the likelihood of success if I did not know where that path lead?

This is not a new question or concept. In 1979, interviewers asked new graduates from Harvard’s MBA Program, “Have you set clear, written goals for your future and made plans to accomplish them?” Only 3% had clear, written goals and plans. Ten years later, they interviewed the same graduates and found that the 3% with clear goals made, on average, 10 times more than the other 97%. 

I needed to organize my plan, and I did so by using SMART goals. 

SMART goals are the following targets for reaching your aim:

  • Specific: Succinctly described
  • Measurable:Attached to numbers
  • Achievable: Realistic
  • Relevant: Focused on a result
  • Time-bound: Attached to a specific deadline.

Now I had somewhere to go. I rewrote my resolution: To give blood five times within 2019, or once every 10 weeks until I reached five. Science only allows me to donate blood every eight weeks. 

Here, we have all of the SMART goals represented: 

  • To give blood (specific, relevant) 
  • Five times (measurable) 
  • Within 2019 (achievable)
  • Twice every 20 weeks until I reach five (time-bound). 

By mapping out a plan, I was able to visualize exactly what it would look like to realize my ambition. By organizing the resolution into quarterly parts, I gave myself plenty of time to reach my goal. Remember, a New Year’s resolution is something you want to achieve throughout the year, not in January. Do not set yourself up for defeat with a haste-focused mentality. You have 12 whole months to work with. Remind yourself it is not a sprint; it is a marathon, and that is how you will create healthy habits. 

How to stick to it (no, really?)

Now that you know what targets to hit, you need to know what you are getting into. Say, for example, you want to quit smoking. You have to decide what method you are going to use, what you can expect and how to combat cravings. 

For my resolution, I needed to figure out how to stop passing out. I took some time to read about why people pass out when giving blood and what I could do to combat it. I learned to stay hydrated, drink more water on donation days, get enough sleep, etc.

When it was time to meet my first quarterly goal, I practiced what I had learned and hoped it would work. The result? I stayed conscious the whole time. Afterward, I celebrated my win with a Double-Double Hamburger with Animal Fries at In-and-Out Burger.

I am proud to say that in 2019, I kept my resolution to give blood at least five times. All it took was a little bit of planning and visualization.

As you settle into 2020, consider a New Year’s resolution that you have always wanted to achieve. What was holding you back? Did it have a metric? Could you measure your success through SMART goals? It is never too late to try again. After all, you have an entire year to work with. No one ever reaches their aspirations easily or without a struggle. But, by using balanced accountability and the 3Ps, you will be able to set yourself up for success instead of failure. 

Whether you’re applying a New Year’s resolution for your personal life or your business, it’s always important to plan, prepare and follow through. Like Abraham Lincoln said, “The best way to predict the future is to create it.” With a clear vision of your future, you will know exactly what steps to take to get there. Happy New Year, and enjoy the journey.  

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon 

Link:  https://www.carwash.com/making-resolution-sticking-it

 

 

Giving Back to Honor Your Hard Work

Giving Back to Honor Your Hard Work

People want to be part of something bigger than themselves

During the holidays (and beyond), it’s important that we hold ourselves and each other accountable for the wellbeing of our communities. It’s not just good for business; it’s the human thing to do. 
 
Over the past year, giving back has increased by 4.1% – making this the 6th consecutive year of growth. With the prevalence of minute-to-minute news, it’s unsurprising that altruism is on the rise. People generally want to respond to the hardships of others with generosity. 
 
If your company is lacking a philanthropic program, now is the time to get one started. There are always reasons not to act, but you absolutely have the money, time, and/or services to spare.  Even if you can’t give financially, there are plenty of ways to show support that won’t affect productivity or the bottom line.
 
For Dale Carlsen, a great mentor of mine and many others, his first contribution was a $100 mattress to a group of underprivileged children. His donation was small, but over time he was able to turn that humble offering into a fully functioning foundation. Dale is now the CEO of Ticket to Dream Foundation for which has provided $43 million worth of essential items for foster youth to go to school with confidence.  This was an act that strengthened the youth for whom he was advocating and the culture of his business among employees and clients.
 
People want to be part of something bigger than themselves. 
 
Winston Churchill said, “We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give.” As a business owner, consider those words and ask yourself, “what kind of life do I want to make?”. For yourself, for your team, and for the world you live in. It’s in your hands.
 
Balanced IQ leadership is partnered with Ticket to Dream Foundation.  If you would like to learn more read Chapter 18 from Balanced Accountability here:  LINK

This year, my family will be donating our time at the Placer Food Bank to prepare and deliver holiday food baskets to people in need.  Email me as I would love to get some other great ideas.  

Link:  10 Ways to Give Back as a Family This Holiday Season

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 

To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon 

Carrot and Stick Does Not Work

Carrot and the Stick Does Not Work

Boost performance and morale with words of affirmation over presents

Your employees don’t care about company gifts as much as you think they do. According to a recent Snappy survey of over 100,000 employees, only 6% noted gifts as their preferred token of appreciation from employers. Without a history of Balanced Accountability or effective leadership, a present for the holidays can be like the “carrot and the stick”: a false and counterproductive motivator.

Many years ago, farmers would wake up early to hitch their mules to the plow. They would grab a carrot from their garden and tie it to a stick, using the contraption to get the mule to move. It worked for a little while, but the animal would get wise. Once it realized that it was never going to get that carrot, it would shut down, leaving their farmer in a bind.

If you dangle promises of recognition in the faces of your staff, they will eventually become disengaged and leave when you don’t deliver. This is an old and ineffective way to manage. It’s time to embrace a new way to get long term results, win hearts, and maximize potential with Balanced Accountability.

The Best Gift You Can Give

Year-end perks are important but done poorly, and you could end up sending the wrong message. An impersonal, poorly planned, or cheap offering can make your employees feel undervalued. You don’t need to spend an exorbitant amount of money to show your appreciation. But you do need to be considerate, and not just once a year. The same Snappy survey found that:

• 46% of employees prefer words of affirmation over presents
• 26% of employees prefer quality time with a supervisor or a coworker
• 22% of employees value receiving help from supervisors or colleagues on a project
Everyone wants to feel valued in their profession. Get started by showing your employees a bit of love this season. Some well thought out gifts, respect, and kindness should do the trick to convey how much they mean to you.

Great Gift – Handwritten Card
I recently received a handwritten thank you card in the mail. Keep in mind what I usually receive junk mail and bills in my mailbox. So anytime I get a handwritten card, it always blows me away.

Handwritten notes always elevate the message so much more than text or email.
The note came in a beautiful card from Lovepop. I’ve officially thrown away my boring ones and upgrade to these amazing cards.

Link to LovePop Cards

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an entrepreneur, author, international speaker, and executive consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

To connect with Alves, please visit his LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon Author’s Page

Accountability = Love

Image result for hr.com logoPublished in HR.com by Hernani Alves

How to Transform into a Modern Leader That Others Will Love to Follow

Love is the foundation of accountability. Don’t worry, that statement seemed vague to me too at first. A good example of this came from Vince Lombardi, former Green Bay Packers coach, and Super Bowl trophy namesake. Lombardi once said, “Love is loyalty, love is teamwork, love respects the dignity of the individual.”. What Lombardi understood was that humans, even tough football players, desire to love and be loved. The result of his leadership was five NFL Championships including wins in Super Bowls one and two. I think it’s safe to say he was on to something.

The Human Side of HR

An incredible Human Resources (HR) executive named Tracy Jackson, Chief Human Resource Officer, SAFE Credit Union, once told me that we need to focus on the human side of HR. This piece of advice put me on the path to viewing accountability as the ultimate act of love for my employees. That concept may make you uncomfortable, but it stems from a basic human need to be loved. A need that doesn’t go away just because we’ve entered the workplace.

Prioritizing accountability is an act that inspires people to reach for their own victories before yours. That’s a kind of motivation you just can’t beat. It’s trusting, it’s empowering, and most importantly, it’s loving.

The Three Ps

I spent years honing in on accountability techniques that really work, and I broke them down into three elements: Personal, Positive, and Performance, or The 3Ps. Along with several human resource professionals, I challenged myself, tested the process, and saw significant improvements in my work performance. Here is what I learned:

P1: Personal Accountability

This is the hardest but most important aspect of the program. As leaders, we must first and foremost hold ourselves accountable. Believe it or not, your employees want to do what you do. Mimicry is human nature, it’s how we learn to function. You have to be willing to lead by example with self-awareness and humility. Seek and listen to feedback on your own work, and focus on finding solutions to challenges instead of playing the victim. Your behavior sets the precedence for the rest of the team.

P2: Positive Accountability

Early on in my career, my team was setting sales records, winning awards, and getting large bonus checks. However, I was told that no one enjoyed working with me; that I was a micromanager. This awarded me the worst nickname you can ever get as a leader (which I reveal in my book).

Positivity might sound “soft”, but it’s essential to getting the results you want. Positivity is what led to my staff presenting me with a Best Leader Award — my most cherished accolade. It’s is how good managers become great leaders. Plus, it’s a heck of a lot more enjoyable than being a Negative Nelly.

Research tells us negativity is contagious, a fact that can be detrimental in the workplace if your attitude is sour. The good news is that positivity is also contagious, and easy to create through your company’s language and actions. We must create positive experiences at work. Keep in mind though; this isn’t about sugar-coating the issues. It’s about taking action to solve a problem. There are tried and true steps that you can take to utilize positive accountability in my book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets To Win Hearts And Maximize Performance. These will help you reduce turnover, increase profitability, and make work a much more enjoyable place to be.

P3: Performance Accountability

The third P is for Performance Accountability. This is more aligned with that more basic understanding of accountability. You know, when you think of hauling someone up for their actions? However, that practice is just begging for resistance and resentment towards your leadership. You can hold someone accountable without resorting to shame or punishment.

Performance Accountability gives you the option to coach your staff to those wins which will, in turn, contribute to the success of your organization as a whole.  Vince Lombardi understood better than anyone how valuable it is to improve team-wide and individual performances to get those wins. You want to boost the confidence of your employees and inspire them to do their best for their own success. When they do that, your success as their leader will follow.

Accountability is a vast concept, but not one that’s hard to figure out. It’s just got to be rooted in love. Love for your business, love for your family, love for the greater good, etc..

I encourage you to get uncomfortable and practice sitting in your feelings of love and gratitude. It will make approaching The 3Ps easier if your motivation is coming from a good and inspiring place. Our need for love is so universal, and the fact that we’re bottling that up at work is making it harder to connect with and motivate each other. It’s imperative that you show your employees that you genuinely care about their success and that the accountability you ask for is not an act of retribution, but a means to set them up for prosperity.

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an entrepreneur, author, international speaker, and executive consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

To connect with Alves, please visit his LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon Author’s Page

Feedback Is A Gift: Seek and Provide It

Published in ProjectManagement.com in Hot Topics for Communication by Hernani Alves

I’m a firm believer that feedback is a gift. When I work with supervisors, it’s usually because they’ve dug themselves into a hole. They keep digging and digging as an attempt to get help. 

Instead, they need to put down the shovel and grab the ladder.  That ladder is S.I.P. feedback. It’s the best place to start when you have nowhere else to go and find yourself in a critical spot. S.I.P. is the ultimate offering and one that, when utilized properly, will propel your team to victory.

But is there really a secret to doing this effectively? Oh yes. In my experience, the most successful leaders do these three things when giving feedback.

  1. Seek Feedback

First and foremost, they seek their own feedback. As a supervisor, you are responsible for your team’s success, which is why you need to start with improving your skills before moving on to theirs. By asking for an assessment of your performance, you’ll be able to communicate with your employees more effectively and, most importantly, demonstrate that accountability is a two-way street.

You’ll need to go into this knowing that the results will likely be tough to hear. Early in my career, I worked my way up to becoming one of the top sales managers in my company, but as a leader, I was struggling. My direct manager, Matt, gave it to me straight: “You’re outstanding and one of the best salespeople we have.”, he said. “However, no one wants to work with you.” Ouch. As difficult as it was for me to hear, that piece of feedback was one of the biggest gifts I’ve ever received in my career. It pushed me to take action and to seek a better way to manage.

When you ask your employees for feedback, don’t argue, don’t defend. Listen, and use what they’re saying as a means to improve. What they’re giving you is a gift that you can use to move yourself and your team forward.  You’ll be shocked to hear after this; your team will be asking for their feedback as well. 

  1.  Increase Positive Feedback

Employees need to hear what they’re doing well. Not all feedback can be positive, but it’s vital to highlight the wins over the losses. It can be easy to focus on shortcomings when giving feedback, but pessimism can be detrimental in the workplace. That doesn’t mean you can’t suggest areas to improve, but who aspires for greatness when it feels fruitless anyway? There’s a balance. Luckily, a negative work atmosphere can be turned around, and the easiest way to do that is with positivity.

 

According to the Harvard Business Review “A large and growing body of research on positive organizational psychology demonstrates that… a positive environment will lead to dramatic benefits for employers, employees, and the bottom line.”. How does this translate to effective feedback? Simple: catch people doing things right.  Celebrate those wins and magnify the positives. Let your individual employees know how much you value their contribution. This not only inspires them to build on their strengths, but it allows them to feel autonomy and ownership in the company. They’ll want to see the team as a whole prosper, and your turnover will go down.

  1.  Provide Healthy Feedback

Giving a positive report is vital – it sets you up to provide healthy feedback. No one wants to hear feedback for feedback’s sake. This process should be intentional with the ultimate goal of seeing improvement. Will it be easy for you or the employee? No way, but it will be worth it.

Consider when you join a gym. Is your trainer your favorite person when they’re pushing you to run one more mile or do one more push up? Probably not. However, they know that the desired result of your fitness journey is not only about transforming your body. It’s about living life to its fullest. Being able to run with your kids, enjoying your clothes, feeling stronger and doing what you want to do.

As a leader, we are tasked to train our employees in a similar way. To hold them accountable, and provide motivation especially when it’s tough so that they can succeed. This is what I consider healthy feedback. It’s intentional and asks both parties to push through difficulties as a means for growth.

Can you utilize feedback without pushing away your team? Absolutely! Remember that you’re giving them a gift. It may not be a gift that they particularly want, but it’s for the greater good. If you focus on the positive and are deliberate with your words, you won’t be crushing their soul with critique; you’ll be providing them with feedback to unleash their fullest potential.  Ready, set, go!

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an entrepreneur, author, international speaker, and executive consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

To connect with Alves, please visit his LinkedIn Profile, Facebook Page or Amazon Author’s Page

Accountable Leadership

By Forward, a publication of the Financial Managers Society    FMSinc.org | 800-ASK-4

AS A LEADER, HOW SHOULD ONE THINK OF THE CONCEPT OF ACCOUNTABILITY? FOR MOST, ACCOUNTABILITY IS SOMETHING THAT HAPPENS WHEN THINGS GO WRONG – THE NOTION OF TAKING OWNERSHIP OF ONE’S MISTAKES. BUT HERNANI ALVES HAS A DIFFERENT POINT OF VIEW

“If you have high turnover on your team, or your employees are regularly not hitting their goals, or just aren’t engaged, it’s because you’re not harnessing the power of effective accountability in your leadership,” Alves, an author and management expert, explains.

“It really is the crux of workplace problems, both big and small.” Alves spent over twenty years as an executive at a $3-billlion company and now works as a consultant with major clients. His passion is spreading the word about balanced accountability – and how it can help transform organizations.

Alves spent over twenty years as an executive at a $3-billlion company and now works as a consultant with major clients. His passion is spreading the word about balanced accountability – and how it can help transform organizations.

“When people think about accountability, they think about punishment,” he says. “They think about it as motivating with a stick instead of a carrot. That’s why I talk about balanced accountability, because on one side you can be too positive and too permissive and not a strong leader, and on the other you can be a micromanager and a harsh leader.”

For Alves, the journey toward balanced accountability began at the latter extreme. When he was first promoted to management, he micromanaged his team – and got positive results doing so.

“My team was getting bonuses, we were getting awards – we were on top of the world,” he recalls. “But my manager told me that my team didn’t want to work with me anymore.”

Surprised and hurt, Alves began making changes that eventually informed his entire approach toward leadership with a strategy he calls the Three P’s of Accountability.

PERSONAL ACCOUNTABILITY

The first step Alves asks leaders to take is one of personal accountability.

“Personal accountability is the most important and challenging aspect of this program. It’s important because, although it may not always feel like it, your employees want to follow you. Just as your kid will mimic you, employees will copy you too. It’s just human nature.”

Personal accountability necessitates holding ourselves as leaders to a high standard. At its core, it’s simply leading by example. However, to take full personal accountability requires a honed sense of self-awareness.

“We have to be hard and honest with ourselves,” Alves says. “We discover how to lead by changing how we think and act.”

Leaders who take personal accountability seriously and have the self-awareness to know when they’ve made a mistake are leaders employees can trust. For example, demanding that employees arrive on time then personally showing up late every day is a surefire way to sow discord and resentment. Only by being honest with oneself and acting as an example to one’s team can a leader find true success.

POSITIVE ACCOUNTABILITY

Positivity is a key element of strong leadership, but it’s one that many leaders shy away from. After all, it sounds a little fluffy.

“Positivity may seem like a soft subject, but it’s essential to improving your bottom line and getting the results you want,” Alves says. “Research tells us negativity is contagious and can have a detrimental effect on the workplace.”

Positivity reduces stress and creates a more engaging atmosphere, but it’s not easy to stay cheerful when the stresses of the industry seem overwhelming. Even so, positive accountability isn’t about sugar-coating a bad situation.

“When you really embrace balanced accountability, it creates a culture where even when you’re not there, your employees are holding themselves accountable.”

“You owe it to your employees to tell them what they need to know, even when it’s not what they want to hear,” Alves explains. “It’s possible to do this and be positive at the same time, even if the message itself isn’t great. Whatever is appropriate to share, you should share honestly.”

But the most important party of positive accountability isn’t cheerful words – it’s affirming actions. Positive accountability means rewarding your team for their successes just as you would hold them accountable for their mistakes.

“Sometimes these things seem unnatural to leaders who aren’t used to them, but they’re really powerful. Praising a team member in front of others or handing out thank you notes for specific actions – these are really effective tactics that cost nothing but a few minutes of your time.”

PERFORMANCE ACCOUNTABILITY

Holding employees responsible for meeting their performance goals is familiar to most leaders, but many do not couple discipline or performance reviews with coaching sessions.

“After leading more than five-thousand people, I’ve seen many seemingly obvious expectations become issues because they were not explicitly laid out,” Alves says. “When you hold someone accountable for their performance, don’t be afraid to communicate your expectations clearly. Employees actually love this. Even when conversations around this are difficult, employees still appreciate them.”

Sometimes when employees exhibit problem behaviors – such as tardiness, missed deadlines or poor communication skills – it’s baggage from a former workplace. All workers come from previous experiences that have created their own personal expectations. Leaders who beat around the bush rather than addressing these types of problems head-on are doing those employees a disservice.

“Once you embrace performance accountability, you’ll be able to set expectations from a new recruit’s first moments, and be confident in dealing with unexpected or even unforgivable behavior,” Alves says. “When you set expectations, you’re not just covering your butt and providing a paper trail for disciplinary actions further down the line. You’re engaging your employees and raising the standard of their work.”

PRIORITIZING ACCOUNTABILITY
Implementing these three principles of accountability may seem less important than filling key positions or managing major risk factors, but Alves argues that embracing them can actually help you with those pressing problems.

“I know it can feel overwhelming, particularly if your life is busy with challenging work situations,” he says. “High turnover, mediocre performance and poorly engaged employees might tempt you to shelve these ideas until things are quieter, but I actually believe that the Three Ps are what will get you to that quieter, more productive, less stressful place.”

Taking balanced accountability seriously means holding oneself and one’s employees to a higher standard, but using positivity and openness to do so.

“Before exploring accountability, I knew I needed a new approach to get the best from my employees,” Alves says. “When you really embrace balanced accountability, it creates a culture where even when you’re not there, your employees are holding themselves accountable.”

Hernani Alves’ book, Balanced Accountability: Three Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, is available from Amazon now.

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 

Maximize Your Business with the 3Ps of Balanced Accountability

A great leader loves their team similar to that of a parent loving their children. As a father, I hold my kids accountable because I know it’s the best way to help them become better versions of themselves. It’s the same drive that fuels my relationship with my employees. I’m grateful for their work, I love them for their contributions, and I want to see them succeed under (and after) my leadership.

This wasn’t always my take on supervising. When I started managing my first team, we were seeing record sales, but my team couldn’t stand me. I was a strict and negative micromanager, and even though our numbers were good, they were unsustainable. How far can a supervisor expect his employees push for them under those conditions? It wasn’t until I started using accountability to improve (not punish) my team that I was able to overcome my faults and eventually become the executive vice-president of a $3 billion company. 

Lack of effective accountability is the crux of most workplace problems, but the fault doesn’t lie on the employees. According to a Partners in Leadership study, 84% of respondents cite their leaders’ behavior as the most important factor in determining the accountability of their work. Employees crave an environment that enhances their abilities. The best way to establish that type organization is through something I call the 3Ps: Personal, Positive, and Performance Accountability. These are the backbone of effective accountability. I’ve mentored countless other leaders through this, and I’ve also experienced it firsthand. It works.

The 3Ps

P1: Personal Accountability

This is the most important “P” of the program. As a leader, you need to hold yourself accountable. Believe it or not, our employees want to follow in our footsteps. You need to be willing to demonstrate self-awareness and humility in your own leadership before asking them to do the same. Request feedback on your own work, and focus on finding solutions to your struggles instead of getting defensive. You set the precedent for the rest of your team.

P2: Positive Accountability

Positivity is essential to achieving sustainable results. It’s how good managers become great leaders. Plus it’s just more enjoyable than being negative. 

We’ve learned that positivity is just as contagious as negativity, which makes creating positive experiences at work absolutely worth it. Celebrating the wins, praising a job well done, and rewarding great performances are all examples of positive accountability. This step not only reduces turnover, but it also increases profitability and makes work a more enjoyable place to be.

P3: Performance Accountability

This is more what you think of when you think about accountability. You know, like “holding someone accountable” for their actions? However, done wrong and you’ll just be inviting your team to resist and resent your leadership. You don’t need shame to hold someone accountable. Performance Accountability allows you to coach your staff instead of penalizing them for their mistakes. Your employees need to know that you have faith in them. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself with an unmotivated and unstable workforce. 

Before giving this program a go, know that you must follow the 3Ps in order. If you jump around, you’ll be missing the foundation needed to make this work. Without a strong footing based on your own accountability and positivity, focussing on performance will come across as strict and unreasonable. No one will want to work with you, and you can forget about them giving you their best. 

Starting with P1 (personal), then P2 (positive) correctly will allow P3 (performance) to naturally follow. You’ll be equipped with the tools you need to get the results you want.

Don’t Manage. Lead.

Performance Accountability touches on the traditional notions of accountability: hitting targets, following rules, and discipline. But the 3Ps don’t rely on asserting authority over your employees, they rely on coaching them instead.

Steve Jobs once said, “My job is not to be easy on people. My job is to take these great people we have and to push and make them even better.” That’s coaching. It’s building up your team when they’re down and celebrating their wins for the hard-fought victories that they are. This mindset is key to making people successful. Not always happy, but successful. For example: when I tell my kids to finish their chores, I’m teaching them to finish a job. They may not be happy about it at that moment, but the habits they form now are going to lead them to success later. I do this for them out of love.

To coach is to motivate, and the 3Ps are designed to help you guide your employees toward improvement and reliability. You’ll find that showing genuine loyalty to your team can influence the way that they perform. It will prompt them to do better. 

Sixty years ago, they would have called me crazy for suggesting that we get personal and positive at the office, but that attitude is changing. We’ve come a long way, but there’s still so much more we need to do to create respectful and humane workplaces that are as enriching as they are productive. The 3Ps are my answer to that call. Give them a try. If you’re struggling in your leadership, I can guarantee that accountability will help you get back on track. I’ve not only seen it work for innumerable others, but my own success is a testament. Ready, Set, Go!

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

Management Lessons Learned On a Driving Range

I took my daughter, Carmina, to the golf range for the first time when she was eight years-old. I was excited to share my favorite hobby with her and wanted her to do well. In my eagerness to create the golf prodigy I never was, I coached her hard. I thought, If I stay on her and ensure she learns right from the start, she’ll be in good shape. She won’t have to unlearn bad habits as I did, losing many balls from my ugly slice. So that afternoon, I corrected every swing and told her how to adjust each angle. She hated it. On the way home, she said she’d never go back. She didn’t want to hit balls ever again. I was devastated, as I’d so wanted to play golf with my daughter.

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