How To Have a Mindset to Overcome Beliefs That Are Holding You Back

Become an Artist…

How many beliefs do we have that are holding you back?  

What if we removed those beliefs (personal and work), what would the possibilities be?

I recently helped a client put together a virtual brainstorming session for their team.

Our primary goal was to lift their spirits and get their minds back into the game.

Unfortunately, their business had significantly suffered the past month.

Most of her team had a low state of mind…actually; nearly all of them were in a Fixed Mindset to weather the storm.

Instead of using a Growth Mindset to maximize everything in their control.

I leveraged Graham Shaw’s TEDx talk to help us. “Why people believe they can’t draw” (29 Million Views).

Most people think they can’t draw, and it’s a belief that is holding some very creative minds back.

In this fun, instructional talk, Graham demonstrates how a few adjustments to your drawing technique (and your attitude) can leave you with a powerful tool.

Here’s a simple exercise for your next Virtual Meeting.

The Power to Draw:

  1. Schedule a 60-minute virtual meeting with your team
  1. Ask how many of them know how to draw?
    • You’ll probably only get a small number of people raising their hands.
  1. Tell them: “Today, we are going to all learn how to draw, and Graham Shaw is going to help us.”
  1. Play:  Graham Shaw, “Why people believe they can’t draw.”:  Link Here (short 15 minutes)
  2. Lead by example and show others your great drawing; they will do the same.

Debrief Questions:

  1. Let’s see each other’s drawings.
    • Compliment and have fun doing this. You’ll find some great artists on your team.
  2. What are some of your takeaways from watching this TEDx talk?
    • Show active listening and validate what they are saying.
  3. Does anyone want to share personally, some beliefs that they may not feel is possible?
    • Give your team 30 seconds to step up; it takes some courage.
    • If not, you share your personal beliefs.
  4. At work, what are some beliefs that may be holding us back from moving forward?
    • Listen and do not shoot down any ideas.
    • Say, “tell me more” when you want more details.
  5. Vote on your top 3 beliefs and work together to DRAW solutions to overcome those.
    • You have now won their hearts, and they will own the solutions to improve.
    • Follow up in the weeks to come.

Have fun with this virtual meeting, and you’ll find the team is inspired to take action to maximize everything their control.

About: Hernani Alves is a business expert, Amazon best-selling author, and speaker that helps leaders build world-class teams. In his book, Balanced Accountability, Hernani reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace by winning hearts to maximize performance.

For a free six-question Employee Report Card, email Hernani@BalancedIQ.com

How to Stop Turnover: Stop the Bleeding

The naughty word

Eighty-two percent of American employees don’t feel recognized by their supervisors. Sixty percent say that they find recognition more motivating than money. If you are losing employees left and right, you need to face the fact that the issue may be your leadership. You need to hold yourself accountable.

Most people hate the word “accountable.” It’s reminiscent of punishment. This stems from misunderstanding and misusing both the word and the practice. Accountability is a tool for improvement, not a means to reprimand.

Lead instead of manage

High turnover and low performance are the results of poor leadership. The problems you’re having with your employees are a direct result of your own practices. That may be hard to hear (and accept), but think about it. Do you deal with unread emails, missed deadlines or tardiness?

These are all signs that you aren’t leading — you’re managing. In other words, you’re not holding them accountable. A disengaged team is a temporary team.

The 3Ps: no more excuses

In a Partners in Leadership study, 84% of subjects cite their leaders’ behavior as the most important factor in determining the accountability of their work. Employees will thrive in an environment that enhances their abilities, and the best way to do this is with the 3Ps: personal, positive and performance accountability.

P1: personal accountability

This is the most important “P” of the program. As a leader, you need to hold yourself accountable first. You need to demonstrate self-awareness and humility in your work ethic before asking employees to do the same. Ask for feedback on your performance as a leader. Find solutions to your issues, and don’t get defensive. You set the precedent for the rest of your team.

P2: positive accountability

Positivity is a must if you want to see sustainable results. It’s how good managers become great leaders. Studies have shown that positivity is as contagious as negativity — meaning that creating positive experiences at work is worth it. This step not only reduces turnover, but it also increases profitability. These are two things that make work a more enjoyable place to be.

P3: performance accountability

This is more in line with what you may generally think about accountability — as in “holding someone accountable” for his or her actions. But, when done wrong, you’re inviting your team to resist and resent your leadership. You don’t need to use shame to hold someone accountable. Performance accountability lets you coach your staff instead of penalizing it for its mistakes. Your employees need to know that you have faith in them. Otherwise, you’ll find yourself with an unmotivated and unstable workforce.

Leading with positivity

Create an environment that your team loves, and your turnover rates will plummet. Employees who love their jobs tend to stay there and flourish. You are the only one who can change your company’s culture, and that will only happen when you take action. It may not feel natural or comfortable at first, but, as JP Morgan once said, “The first step towards getting somewhere is to decide you’re not going to stay where you are.” Choose to feel the discomfort now, and your new behaviors will not only get easier, but they’ll also pay off.

Publicly praise your employees

Go around and catch people doing things right, instead of being the “gotcha” manager. It’s such an ego boost when your leader gives you praise, especially when it’s in front of your colleagues and higher-ups. Highlighting an employee takes very little effort, and it costs nothing. The payback, however, is huge. You can do it while walking around your carwash, or you can take time before or after a meeting to draw attention to someone’s recent win. Find genuine and frequent ways to uplift your employees. It’s vital to keeping them happy.

Share your gratitude

I have gone beyond writing thank you notes to my staff. I’ve actually written thank you notes to their spouses. If I needed an employee to put in overtime, I’d write a note to his or her family to show my gratitude and empathy. You don’t have to get too deep. A simple, “Thank you for your support while Julie works overtime. She’s important to our team, and we’ll make it up to you,” can go a long way. Personal or company-wide emails, notes left on desks, small gifts or a coffee run are all meaningful ways to give thanks to a hard-working team.

Send personalized gifts

This works because it shows appreciation for the employee’s work and individuality. A generic gift card won’t ignite those feelings for them. They might like the gesture, but it’s not going to create the positive experience you’re looking to get.

Get to know your employees. Is one of them always cold? He or she might like USB-heated gloves. What about a golfer? That person would enjoy a round on the course, especially if you play as well. If you have an employee with kids, consider passes to a movie theater or amusement park. There are countless ways to give personalized gifts that show you care. Treat everyone like a S.T.A.R. (Something They Always Remember).

Spending time together

Spending time with your team outside of work is a great experience for everyone. It doesn’t need to be complicated or awkward. Invite your staff out for pizza, or have them over for a barbecue or games. This will create a sense of community for your employees. That feeling of belonging is crucial, and it won’t take much effort.

When you’re digging a hole with turnover, the first thing you need to do is throw away the shovel and build a ladder. The ladder to positivity is recognition and respect. Yes, it takes funds to give gifts and host parties, but look at this as an investment. Turnover is the expense that you can’t afford to have.

You may be responsible for people leaving your organization, but you also have the power to inspire their loyalty. Practice balanced accountability to create a healthy and happy work culture, and your employees will want to stay for as long as you will have them.


Hernani Alves is a business accountability expert, Amazon best-selling author and speaker that helps leaders build world-class teams. In his book, Balanced Accountability, Hernani reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace by winning hearts to maximize performance.

For a free six-question Employee Report Card, email Hernani@BalancedIQ.com

How Your Words Will Inspire Others: Your Team Needs You More Than Ever: 

How many of you still get a little scared when turbulence starts to rattle the plane that you’re traveling in?

How about when the pilot announces over the speaker; “All flight attendants, please cancel service and return to your seats.”

With over 1,000 flights in my lifetime, I still get nervous with turbulence.

Yes, this is all very scary:  coronavirus pandemic, stock market plummeting, and more.

Great News, the sky is NOT falling.

Your teams need you more than ever to be the pilot and guide them through these turbulent times.

We have in similar situations before, and we’ll get through this together.

Many workplace studies focus on anxiety, and research also draws a straight line from an increase in positivity to a decrease in tension.

Think back to the last time you felt stressed out. Were you happy and upbeat about it? Of course not.

As leaders, we want to create better-performing organizations.

Let’s get into it with the number one way you can positively inspire a team: your language.

Using positive language is uplifting. It makes you appear more confident and trustworthy.

When you carefully choose your words, you avoid unnecessary issues that may take time away from your primary goals.

For example, read the following statements and note how each makes you feel:

  • Our company needs to change.
  • Our company needs to improve.

———-

  • Why do you feel like that?
  • Tell me more about how you feel?

———-

  • I see your point, but we need to change this way.
  • I understand your point, and we need to improve this way.

I don’t know about you, but in each pairing, the second statement makes me feel less obligated and resentful.

Just that small change in wording triggered a more positive reaction.

You can and should use small tweaks like these to improve how others respond to you.

It’s all a matter of perspective.

If you have an upbeat attitude that you reflect in your actions and language, it will, without a doubt, trickle down to your team.

Using positive language uplifts the mood of whoever you’re talking too.  It makes you appear more confident, likable, and trustworthy.

You also get better and faster results because you’re less likely to offend people.

Click here to download a list of my top 20 Power Words.

Go conquer this world, it’s always in your control!

About the Author

Hernani Alves started as a part-time employee and eventually grew to become the President for a $3 Billion Company that was regularly voted as Best Workplace. Today, he as an author and international speaker that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting results.

Hernani has been featured in: Stanford University, HR.com, Young Upstart, Best Recruiter, Idea Mensch, CEOWorld Magazine, Conscious Company, Extreme Leadership, and more.

In his book, Balanced Accountability, Hernani reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace by winning hearts to maximize performance.

Download:  Free Six Question Employee Report Card.

To connect with Hernani, please visit his TwitterLinkedIn or Schedule a Call with Hernani

 

How to become a better leader: 6 Stages of Love to Becoming a G.O.A.T. Leader

How to become a better leader: 6 Stages of Love to Becoming a G.O.A.T = Greatest of All Time:  All humans have one thing in common: we want to love and be loved. We accept this idea when it comes to family, pets, sports teams, and favorite bands. But the moment we get to the office, a switch goes off, and that acceptance goes out the window. We don’t show love in the workplace despite its prevalence in the rest of our lives.

If you only associate love with your spouse or family, then it makes sense that it would feel awkward to show it to colleagues. With this in mind, let’s consider love like the ancient Greeks. They viewed it as too complicated to define with one phrase. To them, love took on six forms:

1. EROS (SELF PASSIONATE)

This type of love is irrational and uncompromising. In leadership, this is a “my way or the highway” kind of manager. The manager loves his ideas and authority above all else. It’s not a good look for any manager.

Expect this outcome:  You’re not a leader yet and just a manager.  You will most likely push people away from you, while your results will be short term.

2. PHILIA (FRIENDSHIP)

Philia equates to deep bonds born from shared experiences. It’s loyalty, sacrifice, and belonging. When the pressure is on at work, support your team, and be open with them about the demands you share. You’ll likely find that they want to help you in return.

Expect this outcome:  You’re starting to win hearts and you’re on the right path to becoming a leader.

3. LUDUS (PLAYFUL)

This version of love is a connection built from playfulness, laughter, and banter with those around us. It establishes personal relationships through human interaction. In this new world, Ludus, is getting harder to find, and the leaders doing it are getting the most traction.

Expect this outcome:  You’re starting to create a tribe that others want to follow you.

4. AGAPE (SELF-LESS)

Agape is selfless love, and it’s a must for any leader. It’s universal, empathetic, and kind. We must have each other’s backs as friends and colleagues alike.

Expect this outcome:  You’re becoming highly effective as a leader, and your tribe is starting to say great things about you.

5. PRAGMA (TRUST)

Pragma is rooted in compromise and patience. As a leader, you need to practice empathy for your employees. They’re not cogs in the machine; they’re people. When you treat them as such, they will see and love you for it.

Expect this outcome: You’re on way to becoming a mentor.  Your tribe is starting to come extremely loyal to you and others in your tribe.

6. PHILAUTIA (SELF-LOVE)

Philautia = self-love. Before you can hold anyone else accountable, you must love yourself first enough to practice balanced accountability. It’s the only way to find lasting success.

Expect this outcome:  Congratulations, you’re a G.O.A.T. leading by example, and your tribe will never leave you.  You’ll be maximizing your performance and called upon to share your secrets in love.

Love is an Verb…

You must actively communicate with your tribe about how much you love them, even if you think you’re showing it with your actions. No one is a mind reader. Just be sure to keep the moment genuine. It can be hard to praise or compliment people, so a common reaction is to fall back on comedy as a defense mechanism. It may be natural, but it’s sloppy. To avoid this, start by telling your employees what you love about them and their performances. This process involves showing your feelings but doesn’t require too much sentimentality. For example:

“I love how you helped that client.”

“I love that you turned in this assignment way ahead of schedule.”

“I love your commitment to our team.”

Empower your team to share the love throughout the organization.  A great resource in this modern world is SPARCK.  It’s an online personalized employee recognition and engagement program that creates a thriving workplace your tribe will love.

If the thought of love makes you squirm, you’re not alone. In fact, the “stronger” you are, the more likely you are to resist this. However, when you let your guard down, your tribe will be more than ready to support you. Showing your humanity makes it safe for them to engage, and they’ll be ready to commit to whatever the company needs. When your staff feels loved, it’ll amaze you just how far they’ll be willing to go. Who wouldn’t want that kind of loyalty?

About the Author

Hernani Alves started as a part-time employee and eventually grew to become the President for a $3 Billion Company that was regularly voted as Best Workplace. Today, he as an author and international speaker that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting results.

Hernani has been featured in: Stanford University, HR.com, Young Upstart, Best Recruiter, Idea Mensch, CEOWorld Magazine, Conscious Company, Extreme Leadership, and more.

In his book, Balanced Accountability, Hernani reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace by winning hearts to maximize performance.

Download:  Free Six Question Employee Report Card.

To connect with Hernani, please visit his TwitterLinkedIn or Schedule a Call with Hernani

How You Can Boost Employee Morale in Your Workplace? Boost Efficiency by Purging Your Workplace Baggage

How You Can Boost Employee Morale in Your Workplace? Boost Efficiency by Purging Your Workplace Baggage. Here’s an excercise:  Sit down with your team and have them write out answers to each of the following questions. The only rule here is to take it one item at a time. Do not skip or jump ahead. Read full details below. 

Last week, I went through my closet to do a little spring-cleaning. I had just tossed some old clothes into a 30-gallon bag to donate when I decided to turn the task into a challenge. I told myself to go through my closet one more time. Would you believe that I ended up with another full 30-gallon bag of clothes?

It wasn’t easy to purge two bags of my belongings. I had to continually repeat the phrase, “if I haven’t worn it in a year, it’s time to donate it to someone who will.” At the end of the exercise, I realized that I disliked the clutter more than I liked the clothes.

A similar phenomenon happens in business when we hang onto waste within our organization. Actions that once made sense can become obsolete, but we keep doing them out of habit (or stubbornness). These practices are energy vampires that suck up your time.

When I work with business leaders, they love to learn about maximizing their performance by eliminating wasteful resources. After all, decluttering is less expensive and more accessible than bringing in new costly procedures.

I like to teach this introspection-based technique to help them eliminate at least 20% of their organization’s baggage from the get-go.

Exercise to Purge Your Workplace Baggage

Sit down with your team and have them write out answers to each of the following questions. The only rule here is to take it one item at a time. Do not skip or jump ahead.

  • If you had a list entitled “To Stop Doing,” what would that include? Consider activities that no longer align with your regular work day or your company’s purpose.
  • Where do you feel like you are going through the motions vs. seeing progress in your work?
  • If you had a list entitled “To Start Doing,” what would that include? What do you need to do to see real traction in your daily work? What can you incorporate to make a more significant contribution to your company?
  • If it were totally up to you, what changes would you adopt in your job duties to make the biggest impact towards reaching your company’s goals?

This exercise should take about 2-3 hours of collaboration with your team. After they set their goals, please encourage them to create a peer-to-peer accountability system to support their path to success. Perform 15-minute check-ins every week for three months to make sure that they have the tools that they need to adopt new and efficient behaviors.

Sundar Pichai – CEO Google, recently was asked:  Who do you see as your biggest Competitor.

“I’ve always worried as a company at scale your biggest competition is from within, that you stop executing well, you focus on the wrong things, you get distracted.  I think when you focus on competitors you start chasing and playing by the rules of what others are good at rather than what you makes you good.”

Many times we are looking at our competitors for answers, when we should be challenging our internal processes.  This not only will this  get rid of baggage in the company, it will win the hearts of your people as it shows that you care and want to make them more productive.

About the Author:

About the Author

Hernani Alves started as a part-time employee and eventually grew to become the President for a $3 Billion Company that was regularly voted as Best Workplace. Today, he as an author and international speaker that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting results. Hernani has been featured in: Stanford University, HR.com, Best Recruiter, Idea Mensch, CEOWorld Magazine, Conscious Company, Extreme Leadership, and more.

In his book, Balanced Accountability, Hernani reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace by winning hearts to maximize performance.  Download:  Free Six Question Employee Report Card.

About the Author

Hernani Alves started as a part-time employee and eventually grew to become the President for a $3 Billion Company that was regularly voted as Best Workplace. Today, he as an author and international speaker that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting results.

Hernani has been featured in: Stanford University, HR.com, Best Recruiter, Idea Mensch, CEOWorld Magazine, Conscious Company, Extreme Leadership, and more.

In his book, Balanced Accountability, Hernani reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace by winning hearts to maximize performance.

Download:  Free Six Question Employee Report Card.

To connect with Hernani, please visit his TwitterLinkedIn or Schedule a Call with Hernani

See on Linkedin:  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/boost-efficiency-purging-your-workplace-baggage-hernani-alves

 

How do you work best in a team? INSPIRE TEAM-WIDE ENGAGEMENT THROUGH CLEAR EXPECTATIONS

How do you work best in a team?  As a leader, it’s up to you to set expectations among your team. From each recruits’ first day to an existing employee’s tenth year in. It’s never too late to turn your wayward staff into a dream team. In a study by from Florida State University, shows that curated work-goals (self-assigned or provided) can increase employee productivity even without monetary incentives.  Reaching for a target allows them to be more productive. They’ll also come to view you as a driving force for their improvement. In other words, you’ll win their hearts and raise their standards all in one go. That’s how you go from becoming a Leader to becoming their Mentor.

Inspire Team-Wide Engagement Through Clear Expectations

You can’t hold someone accountable for something they’re unaware of. It’s surprising how often leaders actually do this. Before you think you’re excluded, stay with me.

When my wife and I bought our first home, we went to Home Depot to buy some plants for our new backyard. While I was perusing, I felt a sharp pain in the back of my leg. I turned around and saw my assailant: a child no more than three years old. He had pushed a shopping cart right into me. His father came running over, mortified, and apologizing. It left a mark and caused my leg to bleed and I couldn’t get mad. This kid had likely never learned that slamming shopping carts into other people isn’t ok. He wasn’t being disobedient or reckless. He was trying a new experience, and unfortunately for me, it wasn’t his best moment. But I couldn’t feel anger – he had no idea what he was doing.

Your employees aren’t much different. They’re always on the lookout for cues on what they should be doing. Without voicing your expectations, you shouldn’t consider them established. Consequentially, you can’t be mad or surprised when they go unmet by your staff. If you haven’t thoroughly trained someone, how can you hold them accountable?

What you Permit, You Promote

This is why personal accountability is paramount for effective leadership. You have to level-up your own game before you can ask your staff to make any changes. Your efforts will go nowhere if you’re caught holding your employees to a higher standard than yourself. For example, getting to work on time. If you’re often late, you’re setting the expectation that tardiness is tolerable. Exhibiting poor behavior is promoting poor behavior. As the leader, you may feel like you should be able to roll in whenever. But you never know what your employees have ingrained in them about punctuality. If you don’t tell them to prioritize promptness, you cannot fault them for making their own time.

I’ve lead thousands of people in my career, and unmet expectations is always a theme. Common complaints I hear from leaders about their staff include but are not limited to:

  • Using inappropriate language
  • Missed deadlines
  • Lack of engagement during meetings
  • Tending to personal matters while working
  • Unprofessional appearances

These are all issues stemming from poor communication from the leader. But why state the obvious when it comes to abhorrent behavior? Consider the study guide provided for the Canadian citizenship test. It notes that violations such as spousal abuse and gender-based violence is unacceptable. Canada doesn’t take for granted that people will identify these as punishable acts. And what does Canada lose by stating it? Half an inch of space on a PDF? What you have to gain from effective communication will also outweigh what you have to lose.

Leadership to Mentoring

How a leader handles an unmet expectation speaks to the control they hold. A great leader coaches where a struggling leader will punish. A “gotcha” manager is an unsustainable manager. That is begging for a team without loyalty or dedication. If you’re only catching people when they’re doing something wrong, you’re not getting the most or best out of your employees. Help them well before it reaches that point by giving them the instructions they crave.

As a leader, it’s up to you to set expectations among your team. From each recruits’ first day to an existing employee’s tenth year in. It’s never too late to turn your wayward staff into a dream team. In a study by from Florida State University, shows that curated work-goals (self-assigned or provided) can increase employee productivity even without monetary incentives.  Reaching for a target allows them to be more productive. They’ll also come to view you as a driving force for their improvement. In other words, you’ll win their hearts and raise their standards all in one go. That’s how you go from becoming a Leader to becoming their Mentor.

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 

To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon

See on Linkedin:  https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/inspire-team-wide-engagement-through-clear-hernani-alves/

What can I do to be a Better Manager? 3 Ps of Accountability

What can I do to be a Better Manager?  Lead by example to help reshape the future of your employees. The real job of a boss is coaching. It’s not about being a pushover—you must be firm about unforgivable grievances. But you must also look for opportunities to build employees up and make them greater than yourself.

By Hernani Alves:  As seen in Construction Magazine

Predict the Future

Abraham Lincoln said the best way to predict your future is to create it. One of the United States’ greatest presidents acknowledged that everyone is in control of their own destiny. Lincoln faced one of the biggest challenges of any president: slavery. With such a harshly divided nation, he could have easily become defeated by the challenges he faced. Instead, he did what all phenomenal leaders do—he led by example. Because of his leadership, the inhumanity of slavery was contained. He created a new reality, a new destiny. Today’s business leaders must also lead by example with the three Ps of accountability.

1. Personal Accountability

It’s easy to get caught up in deadlines and forget that work is a personal experience. Many people spend more time at work than anywhere else. When you spend this much time somewhere, the environment is bound to rub off on you. The sheer amount of time involved is why company leaders influence is so impactful.

Your employees are watching you, and they are mimicking what you do. As such, it’s important to hold yourself accountable before you can expect to hold others accountable. Make yourself better first so that you can lead by example. This is difficult, as it requires self-awareness, which doesn’t come naturally to most of us, but is essential.

Leaders must also understand themselves before they can successfully lead others. If you take the victim stance, your employees will too, and then they’ll be harder to lead. Have a hero mentality in front of your employees and be open to their feedback about how you can improve as a leader. Ask them, “What would you like me to do more and less of as a leader?” Then, listen and take action.

2. Positive Accountability

Positivity isn’t about being a cheerleader about every situation. Employees can see through a false demeanor or sugar coating a bad situation. Positivity is an overall attitude and approach to managing. It’s about catching employees doing things right.

See the best in a situation and inspire your workers to do the same. This relates back to your personal touch in personal accountability. If you’re not portraying positivity, your employees can’t mimic it.

Watch the language you use, as well. Even something as simple as an email explaining an update to the company’s insurance plan is an opportunity for spreading positivity. For example, if your company’s plan has recently added a free yearly dental cleaning for its employees, don’t just make “Changes to your dental insurance plan” as your email subject line. This vague statement could send employees into a panic about what may now not be covered that once was. And this will be especially worrisome for someone facing a painful procedure like a root canal.

Instead, make the subject line positive instead. Replace the word “change” with “improve.” For example, “Improvements to your dental insurance plan.” It seems minute and perhaps trivial, but building up small messages of positivity such as these set a tone for your workforce.  The word change tends to make people think negative at first when it truly means improvements.

3. Performance Accountability

This is more in line with most people’s understanding of accountability—hauling someone up for their actions, discipline or performance reviews. You can’t skip this part, but you can’t reach it without the first having both personal and positive accountability.

Once you build personal relationships and set a tone of positivity, your employees respect you and may want to hear your feedback about their performance. Wanting to please authority figures you admire and trust is human nature.

The real job of a boss is coaching. It’s not about being a pushover—you must be firm about unforgivable grievances. But you must also look for opportunities to build employees up and make them greater than yourself.

Once you put these practices in place, you’ll build a team of engaged, positive-minded employees who come to work looking for ways to make their employer happy. The bottom line of needing to work for income will always be there, but added to it will be purpose and true enjoyment of their work and colleagues.

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the framework needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon

Link:  https://www.constructionbusinessowner.com/management/be-better-manager-3-ps-accountability

How do you write a New Year’s resolution? Making a Resolution and Sticking to IT (No Really?)


Three tricks for achieving your New Year’s resolution with
balanced accountability


How do you write a New Year’s resolution?  New Year’s resolutions have become ambitions without a plan. “Save money,” “get in shape” and “travel” were all top resolutions set by Americans in 2018. But what do those aspirations look like? The statements in themselves do not offer a starting place.  To achieve something, you need to have a path towards that goal. Like a map to your destination, you must be able to see where you are going — street names, landmarks and mile markers. In goal setting, your map is “balanced accountability.”

By Hernani Alves:  As seen in Professional Car Wash Magazine

Setting a goal for the New Year may feel like manifesting the new you. Who is not trying to get promoted, eat healthier, spend more quality time with family and travel more? What makes us think that a magical switch goes off on Jan. 1st that will allow us to change? The expectation is far-fetched, and yet over 40% of Americans partake. 

Don’t get me wrong — there is no shame in trying to change for the better, but we are failing to make it work. It can be demoralizing. It is no wonder that New Year’s resolutions have an 80% failure rate. It is time to change this and make it an 80% success rate.

Balanced accountability

New Year’s resolutions have become ambitions without a plan. “Save money,” “get in shape” and “travel” were all top resolutions set by Americans in 2018. But what do those aspirations look like? The statements in themselves do not offer a starting place. 

To achieve something, you need to have a path towards that goal. Like a map to your destination, you must be able to see where you are going — street names, landmarks and mile markers. In goal setting, your map is “balanced accountability.”

Balanced accountability is accountability that is fair and balanced. It uses clear expectations and firm rules weighed with praise and rewards. It guides you to where you want to go and keeps you motivated to continue. It is practiced by using what I call the 3Ps.

The 3Ps

I am proud to say that for the last three years, every member of my family has kept their New Year’s resolutions. We have done so with the 3Ps of accountability.

 Personal accountability

To keep a resolution, it is crucial to hold yourself accountable. I struggled with this for years, but now I know exactly what this means and how to do it. Share your aspirations with friends and family. Ask for help, and be open about your successes and struggles. Give yourself the personal accountability that you need. 

Positive accountability

How do you eat an elephant? One small bite at a time, and positivity is essential to staying driven. You need to celebrate the small accomplishments along the way to reaching your goal. Tell others when you have a win, and bring them in on your journey. Reward yourself.

Performance accountability

This is the traditional practice of “holding yourself accountable.” But it uses coaching, not penalizing. This is your starting point for mapping out the path to your objective. 

Mapping out a resolution

In December 2018, my family wanted me to give blood as a way to help our community during the holidays. My blood type (O-) is always in demand, so my family insisted that I take action and help others. As much as I wanted to help out, I was apprehensive. I have never been good at giving blood — meaning I pass out. Even so, I agreed to try.

The blood drive was packed. It was great, and there were so many people there ready and willing to give. When the facilitators of the drive noticed my blood type, they pulled out the VIP treatment. I was moved to the front of the line, and they only took about three minutes to prepare for my blood draw. On the first attempt, they missed the vein, and I started to get woozy — right on cue. They had to stop the process and send me home as a “pre-fainter.” At that moment, I resolved that in 2019, I was going to do something I had never done before: donate blood at least five times. 

The sentiment was great but a little unclear. What did I want? To give blood once that year, no matter what? To teach myself how to give blood without passing out? To give blood every other month? I was not going to reach my goal without knowing what it was. How could I? Even if I found myself on a path, what was the likelihood of success if I did not know where that path lead?

This is not a new question or concept. In 1979, interviewers asked new graduates from Harvard’s MBA Program, “Have you set clear, written goals for your future and made plans to accomplish them?” Only 3% had clear, written goals and plans. Ten years later, they interviewed the same graduates and found that the 3% with clear goals made, on average, 10 times more than the other 97%. 

I needed to organize my plan, and I did so by using SMART goals. 

SMART goals are the following targets for reaching your aim:

  • Specific: Succinctly described
  • Measurable:Attached to numbers
  • Achievable: Realistic
  • Relevant: Focused on a result
  • Time-bound: Attached to a specific deadline.

Now I had somewhere to go. I rewrote my resolution: To give blood five times within 2019, or once every 10 weeks until I reached five. Science only allows me to donate blood every eight weeks. 

Here, we have all of the SMART goals represented: 

  • To give blood (specific, relevant) 
  • Five times (measurable) 
  • Within 2019 (achievable)
  • Twice every 20 weeks until I reach five (time-bound). 

By mapping out a plan, I was able to visualize exactly what it would look like to realize my ambition. By organizing the resolution into quarterly parts, I gave myself plenty of time to reach my goal. Remember, a New Year’s resolution is something you want to achieve throughout the year, not in January. Do not set yourself up for defeat with a haste-focused mentality. You have 12 whole months to work with. Remind yourself it is not a sprint; it is a marathon, and that is how you will create healthy habits. 

How to stick to it (no, really?)

Now that you know what targets to hit, you need to know what you are getting into. Say, for example, you want to quit smoking. You have to decide what method you are going to use, what you can expect and how to combat cravings. 

For my resolution, I needed to figure out how to stop passing out. I took some time to read about why people pass out when giving blood and what I could do to combat it. I learned to stay hydrated, drink more water on donation days, get enough sleep, etc.

When it was time to meet my first quarterly goal, I practiced what I had learned and hoped it would work. The result? I stayed conscious the whole time. Afterward, I celebrated my win with a Double-Double Hamburger with Animal Fries at In-and-Out Burger.

I am proud to say that in 2019, I kept my resolution to give blood at least five times. All it took was a little bit of planning and visualization.

As you settle into 2020, consider a New Year’s resolution that you have always wanted to achieve. What was holding you back? Did it have a metric? Could you measure your success through SMART goals? It is never too late to try again. After all, you have an entire year to work with. No one ever reaches their aspirations easily or without a struggle. But, by using balanced accountability and the 3Ps, you will be able to set yourself up for success instead of failure. 

Whether you’re applying a New Year’s resolution for your personal life or your business, it’s always important to plan, prepare and follow through. Like Abraham Lincoln said, “The best way to predict the future is to create it.” With a clear vision of your future, you will know exactly what steps to take to get there. Happy New Year, and enjoy the journey.  

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon 

Link:  https://www.carwash.com/making-resolution-sticking-it

 

 

What give back means? Giving Back to Honor Your Hard Work

What give back means? People want to be part of something bigger than themselves.  Winston Churchill said, “We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give.” As a business owner, consider those words and ask yourself, “what kind of life do I want to make?”. For yourself, for your team, and for the world you live in. It’s in your hands.

Giving Back to Honor Your Hard Work

People want to be part of something bigger than themselves

During the holidays (and beyond), it’s important that we hold ourselves and each other accountable for the wellbeing of our communities. It’s not just good for business; it’s the human thing to do. 
 
Over the past year, giving back has increased by 4.1% – making this the 6th consecutive year of growth. With the prevalence of minute-to-minute news, it’s unsurprising that altruism is on the rise. People generally want to respond to the hardships of others with generosity. 
 
If your company is lacking a philanthropic program, now is the time to get one started. There are always reasons not to act, but you absolutely have the money, time, and/or services to spare.  Even if you can’t give financially, there are plenty of ways to show support that won’t affect productivity or the bottom line.
 
For Dale Carlsen, a great mentor of mine and many others, his first contribution was a $100 mattress to a group of underprivileged children. His donation was small, but over time he was able to turn that humble offering into a fully functioning foundation. Dale is now the CEO of Ticket to Dream Foundation for which has provided $43 million worth of essential items for foster youth to go to school with confidence.  This was an act that strengthened the youth for whom he was advocating and the culture of his business among employees and clients.
 
People want to be part of something bigger than themselves. 
 
Winston Churchill said, “We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give.” As a business owner, consider those words and ask yourself, “what kind of life do I want to make?”. For yourself, for your team, and for the world you live in. It’s in your hands.
 
Balanced IQ leadership is partnered with Ticket to Dream Foundation.  If you would like to learn more read Chapter 18 from Balanced Accountability here:  LINK

This year, my family will be donating our time at the Placer Food Bank to prepare and deliver holiday food baskets to people in need.  Email me as I would love to get some other great ideas.  

Link:  10 Ways to Give Back as a Family This Holiday Season

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an Amazon best selling author, international speaker, and consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

 

To connect with Alves, visit his Website, LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon 

How to Increase Accountability in the Workplace? Carrot and Stick Does Not Work

Carrot and the Stick Does Not Work

Boost performance and morale with words of affirmation over presents

How to Increase Accountability in the Workplace?  Your employees don’t care about company gifts as much as you think they do. According to a recent Snappy survey of over 100,000 employees, only 6% noted gifts as their preferred token of appreciation from employers. Without a history of Balanced Accountability or effective leadership, a present for the holidays can be like the “carrot and the stick”: a false and counterproductive motivator.

Many years ago, farmers would wake up early to hitch their mules to the plow. They would grab a carrot from their garden and tie it to a stick, using the contraption to get the mule to move. It worked for a little while, but the animal would get wise. Once it realized that it was never going to get that carrot, it would shut down, leaving their farmer in a bind.

If you dangle promises of recognition in the faces of your staff, they will eventually become disengaged and leave when you don’t deliver. This is an old and ineffective way to manage. It’s time to embrace a new way to get long term results, win hearts, and maximize potential with Balanced Accountability.

The Best Gift You Can Give

Year-end perks are important but done poorly, and you could end up sending the wrong message. An impersonal, poorly planned, or cheap offering can make your employees feel undervalued. You don’t need to spend an exorbitant amount of money to show your appreciation. But you do need to be considerate, and not just once a year. The same Snappy survey found that:

• 46% of employees prefer words of affirmation over presents
• 26% of employees prefer quality time with a supervisor or a coworker
• 22% of employees value receiving help from supervisors or colleagues on a project
Everyone wants to feel valued in their profession. Get started by showing your employees a bit of love this season. Some well thought out gifts, respect, and kindness should do the trick to convey how much they mean to you.

Great Gift – Handwritten Card
I recently received a handwritten thank you card in the mail. Keep in mind what I usually receive junk mail and bills in my mailbox. So anytime I get a handwritten card, it always blows me away.

Handwritten notes always elevate the message so much more than text or email.
The note came in a beautiful card from Lovepop. I’ve officially thrown away my boring ones and upgrade to these amazing cards.

Link to LovePop Cards

About the Author:

Hernani Alves is an entrepreneur, author, international speaker, and executive consultant with over twenty years of business experience as a Sales Executive for a $3 Billion Company. He’s the founder of Balanced IQ, a company that helps leaders build world-class teams focused on getting sustainable results in varying economic climates.

In his book, Balanced Accountability: Three Leadership Secrets to Win Hearts and Maximize Performance, Alves delivers a newfound clarity on the case for accountability and the steps organizations, and individuals need to take to unleash their potential. He reveals the frame work needed to improve accountability in the workplace to win hearts and maximize performance.

To connect with Alves, please visit his LinkedIn Profile, Facebook or Amazon Author’s Page

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